Wednesday, October 27, 2010

The Me Me Me Me Generation

People used to call the generation of people born to veterans of World War II the "ME" generation, in criticism of their selfish and hedonistic ways, but these critics had no way of knowing how selfish and hedonistic the grandchildren of the WWII generation would become.

I've had my differences with the boomers though the years, but a lot of the stuff they fought for was pretty legitimate: the right not to be drafted into military service, social and racial integration and the fight for the health and welfare of the poor and elderly. 

The boomers fought for the right of artists to express themselves freely, without the heavy hand of censorship in their work.  While the boomers fought for free content in art, they were certainly willing to pay for the works once they were produced.  Boomers all over the world saved their allowance and lined up at record stores to pay for the latest works of Lead Zeppelin or the Beatles or whoever, because they wanted it.

Their children feel just as strongly about the censorship of artists, but they go an extra step and now demand the music itself for free, over the internet, along with movies and video games, and if you don't give it to them they'll take it from sites like Piratebay.

Somewhere along here, I gotta call bullshit.  With the possible exception of food and medicine, demanding stuff for free or you'll just take it isn't freedom fighting, it's looting.

For many of these assholes, I know their parents taught them better because I know their parents, or people just like them.  The problem is, parents don't usually know what a kid is up to alone in his room with a computer unless or until a subpoena shows up at the door.

Legitimately purchased popular music is cheaper now than ever before.  I'm sorry that's not good enough for you.  I suppose there is no business model as attractive to these kids as getting their shit for free.

I would suggest you're killing the goose that laid the golden eggs though.  The music and movie business are on tougher times than they've ever been before and they day may soon come that there just isn't that much to steal anymore.

5 comments:

  1. Personal responsibility?
    Ethics?
    My definition: Those things one does at 3am when no ones looking and no ones gonna know.

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  2. I find this post one of the most interesting ones that you have posted. There is one side of me that believes, Hey Boyd, give these kids a break. They are not stealing in the biblical sense. By that I mean, they are not stealing a neighbor's good that would cost that neighbor that good to replace.
    Then there is the other side of me, that is taking over, (albeit more slowly), who believes, Hey you little son of a bitch (NOT you Boyd), what the hell do you need 1,000 illegally downloaded songs anyway.
    See, people have to be sold on the idea, that perhaps one day, one will be able to create something that could be digitized and sold to propel them into the creative class.
    I remember a while back when I heard a man named Jaron Lanier talk about how the younger generation believes everything should be free. Because of that belief, their generation may be falling behind the previous generation who has profited from their creations.
    Intellectual property is a very important concept. Yes, I may get upset when Second Life takes away an animation someone has given me, but I understand that it is for the greater good.

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  3. Here is a comment about the law. Technically it is not illegal to receive copy righted material. It is only illegal to distribute it. Does not make it right, but it is still not illegal. So unless Johnny is sharing music a subpoena is unlikely to how up at his doorstep. The people that are breaking the law are the website owners, not the downlooaders.

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  4. that's how the file sharing networks work though. you share what's on your harddrive with the other members. Most of them allow you to opt out of the sharing but a lot of people don't bother checking it.

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  5. I am aware of that, but most people opt out.

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